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Eating at the Olympics: Arigato Japan Food Tours

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TOKYO (WFLA) — One of the best things about exploring Japan is the food, and for the country, it’s big business.

Tsukiji Fish Market, a bucket list food destination for many, is a haven for sushi, seafood, ramen, and more.

Anne Kyle owns Arigato Japan Food Tours. Arigato has 40 different food tours showcasing the flavors of Japan, from tea to street food and everything in between.

“You’ll definitely noticed most places specialize in one thing,” Kyle said. “So if it’s sushi, that place will only serve sushi. If it’s ramen, then that’s only ramen. That is because the Japanese artisan spirit really believes in perfecting one thing. And that’s the only thing that they will give to you. Sixteen perfecting that to the highest level is really showcasing the shokunin spirit of Japan.”

Kyle said her business has taken a major hit during the pandemic.

“Things were really good before the pandemic, but given how things are iin Japan right now, we are really struggling,” Kyle said.

She hoped the Olympics would help, but it’s been tough without foreign spectators. She is looking ahead with hopes of a brighter future for the industry.

“I do think once things get better all eyes will be on Japan again,” she said.

Bank of England keeps its main interest rate at 0.1%

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LONDON (AP) — The Bank of England has kept its main interest rate unchanged at the record low of 0.1% and says it expects the British economy to reach its pre-pandemic level by the end of the year. In a statement accompanying its decision, the central bank’s rate-setting Monetary Policy Committee said Thursday that “a waning impact” from COVID-19 would boost demand growth over the rest of the year. The bank projected further out that growth is expected to slow toward more normal rates, partly reflecting lower government spending as many pandemic support programs end. The monetary committee also appeared sanguine about higher inflation, saying that currently elevated global and domestic cost pressures will prove “transitory.”

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Israeli defense minister threatens Iran with military action

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TEL AVIV, Israel (AP) — Israel’s defense minister is warning that his country is prepared to strike Iran. Benny Gantz issued the threat Thursday against Islamic Republic after a fatal drone strike on a oil tanker at sea that his nation blamed on Tehran. That tanker is managed by a firm owned by an Israeli billionaire. The U.S. and the United Kingdom similarly blamed Iran for the attack, but no country has offered evidence or intelligence to support their claims. Iran, which along with its regional militia allies have launched similar drone attacks, has denied being involved. Israel is lobbying countries for action at the United Nations over the assault.

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Q&A: Democrat Shontel Brown on how she won Ohio primary

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COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Shontel Brown’s victory for the Democratic nomination for a Cleveland-area congressional seat came almost out of the blue. She crushed a double-digit lead that progressive firebrand Nina Turner had built over months in just a few weeks’ time. In an interview with The Associated Press, Turner emphasizes the importance of bipartisanship, both within the Democratic Party and across the aisle, in an implicit criticism of Turner and progressives’ role in Washington. She also highlights how it was local legislators, not political heavyweights, who led her to victory.

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Eating at the Olympics: Arigato Japan Food Tours

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TOKYO (WFLA) — One of the best things about exploring Japan is the food, and for the country, it’s big business.

Tsukiji Fish Market, a bucket list food destination for many, is a haven for sushi, seafood, ramen, and more.

Anne Kyle owns Arigato Japan Food Tours. Arigato has 40 different food tours showcasing the flavors of Japan, from tea to street food and everything in between.

“You’ll definitely noticed most places specialize in one thing,” Kyle said. “So if it’s sushi, that place will only serve sushi. If it’s ramen, then that’s only ramen. That is because the Japanese artisan spirit really believes in perfecting one thing. And that’s the only thing that they will give to you. Sixteen perfecting that to the highest level is really showcasing the shokunin spirit of Japan.”

Kyle said her business has taken a major hit during the pandemic.

“Things were really good before the pandemic, but given how things are iin Japan right now, we are really struggling,” Kyle said.

She hoped the Olympics would help, but it’s been tough without foreign spectators. She is looking ahead with hopes of a brighter future for the industry.

“I do think once things get better all eyes will be on Japan again,” she said.

Here are the most dangerous areas to drive in Charlotte

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CHARLOTTE, N.C. (FOX 46 CHARLOTTE) – Where are the most dangerous areas to drive in Charlotte? City officials document the traffic-related data in the High Injury Network.

Data shows between that 2016 and 2020 there were 128 serious or fatal crashes on Charlotte streets and highways. More than 30% of those crashes happened in 2020 which was one of the deadliest years for crashes since 2017.


Dump trucks collide in Charlotte, killing two, officials say

August is National Traffic Awareness Month. The High Injury Network is a part of a plan to reduce traffic-related deaths and injuries.

On a stretch between North Tryon Street and University City Boulevard data shows 60 people were killed or seriously injured from 2016-2020.

City officials use the High Injury Network to break down the areas where there are severe accidents as opposed to including minor fender benders.

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Here are the top 10 most dangerous driving areas in Charlotte looking at data from 2016-2020:

N Tryon Street and University City Boulevard, 60 people were killed or seriously injured
Eastway Drive and Central Avenue, 52 people were killed or seriously injured
Freedom Drive to Pacific Street, 51 people were killed or seriously injured
The Plaza and Murdock Road, 46 people were killed or seriously injured
South Tryon Street and Lions Mane Street, 42 people were killed or seriously injured
Wilkinson Boulevard and Boyer Street, 38 people were killed or seriously injured
West Brookshire Freeway and North Crigler Street, 37 people were killed or seriously injured
West Sugar Creek Rd and I-85, 36 people were killed or seriously injured
EW T Harris Boulevard and Windsor Gate Lane, 34 people killed or seriously injured
West Boulevard and Ross Avenue, 34 killed or seriously injured

Charlotte Mecklenburg Police Department officials use the High Injury Network as a way to plan where officers should be for enforcement.

City officials focus on tracking high injury networks instead of intersections because this allows them to get a better idea of where the fatal and serious crashes are happening, instead of focusing on every fender bender.

Data shows most crashes are happening between 4 p.m. and 6 p.m. and between 8 p.m. and midnight are also dangerous times. Click here to view the full map.

‘We need to do a better job’: Federal officials vow to step up firefighting resources in California

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GLENN COUNTY, Calif. (KTXL) — Members of the Biden administration met with Gov. Gavin Newsom in Glenn County Wednesday as the federal government promises to step up its firefighting resources.

The governor, the U.S. agriculture secretary and the new fire chief for the U.S. Forest Service arrived at a hazy Mendocino Forest, which was the site of the August Complex fires — California’s largest fire ever recorded. 

“We have to have more boots on the ground, and I pledge to you and commit to you that will happen,” said U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack.

Vilsack vowed to boost federal resources to respond to and prevent wildfires.

“We need to make sure that our firefighters are better compensated. Governor, that will happen,” Vilsack said. “We need to do a better job and more of forest management to reduce the risk of catastrophic wildfire. Governor, that’s going to happen.”


Dixie Fire burns more than 274K acres, becomes state’s 8th largest wildfire

Vilsack’s promises come as Congress debates the federal infrastructure bill, what he said could be a downpayment of billions toward boosting the needed resources.

U.S. Forest Service Chief Randy Moore said his agency is preparing.

“We’re trying to organize now so we can be more a little bit more strategic and not get caught off guard,” Moore said. “Our expectation is Congress will pass the bill, and our expectation is to be able to provide as quick as we possibly can.”

But Vilsack couldn’t give a specific timeline on how soon California could see the specific changes. He said improvements will begin when the federal fiscal budget is set Oct. 1.

“You’re going to see significant improvement and significant effort and significant work in the next fiscal year, late ‘21, early ‘22,” he said.

The commitment came as the governor and federal leaders took in the site of last year’s August Complex. Smoke hung in the dry air from fires now burning further north. Gov. Newsom said California is working to contain nine large, active wildfires.


Hot, gusty weather could mean explosive fire growth in West

“A simultaneous crises of not only drought, impacted by climate, extreme heat, extreme weather, dry soil conditions, but also energy reliability,” Newsom said.

While he’s encouraged by promises from the Biden administration, Cal Fire Chief Thom Porter said it could take 10 to 20 years before firefighting resources catch up with the intensity of recent fires.

“We don’t have a choice because that’s what it’s going to take,” Porter said. “It took us 100 years to get here, it’s going to take us decades to work our way out of it and a continuous effort to do so.”

Belarus to close border as Lithuania turns away migrants

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KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — The president of Belarus on Thursday ordered the country’s security forces to tighten control over the border with Lithuania, which earlier this week started turning away immigrants attempting to cross in from Belarus. The surge of Iraqis and others entering Lithuania from neighboring Belarus has emerged as a major foreign policy issue. On Tuesday, Lithuania turned away 180 people attempting to enter the country. President Alexander Lukashenko on Thursday ordered defense and security agencies to “close every meter of the border” in order not to let immigrants Lithuania turns away back into Belarus. Lithuania said a surge of mostly Iraqi migrants was retaliation by Lukashenko after the EU put sanctions on Belarus over recently diverting a plane and arresting a dissident aboard.

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Paris Olympics moves up with two presidents on center stage

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TOKYO (AP) — The stress of postponing and finally staging the Tokyo Olympics contrasts with the relative calm and steady leadership of the next Summer Games host. The 2024 Paris Olympics emerges fully on Sunday from its unexpected extra year in the shadows with a formal handover from Tokyo. The event will feature French President Emmanuel Macron at home and Paris organizing committee president Tony Estanguet in Tokyo. Two 43-year-old presidents with barely a gray hair and both at ease speaking English. It’s a change from the Tokyo Olympic leadership that changed in a fraught final year of preparations.

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Police allege Hillsong founder concealed child sex abuse

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CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — Police say the founder of the Sydney-based global Hillsong Church, Brian Houston, has been charged with concealing child sex offenses. They say detectives served Houston’s lawyers with a notice for him to appear in a Sydney court on Oct. 5 for allegedly concealing a serious indictable offense. He professed his innocence and said he will defend himself against the charges. Houston suggested the charges related to allegations that his preacher father, Frank Houston, had abused a young boy over several years in the 1970s. A government inquiry found in 2015 that he did not tell police that his father was a child sex abuser.

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