Several volunteers and agencies are lending a helping hand to clean up Hurricane Sally

0
109

Pensacola, Fl

 Help is still available for people suffering massive damage from Hurricane Sally.

Since Hurricane Sally hit our community, more than 5,000 calls have been made to the Crisis Cleaning Hotline – calls still coming every day.

 How can those in need get help.

A long road to recovery for many Northwest Florida residents, but they don’t have to do it alone.

“Getting help means a lot to me, and the people who come to do it.”

Pensacola resident John Jones fell several trees on his property during Hurricane Sally, which damaged the roof of his home and crushed his car. Call the crisis cleaning hotline for help.

“I’ll just be honest.” Jones said, “It will probably never be done. Unless the government steps in and does something, it will never get done.”

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is one of several local organizations that assist in the relief effort.

“We have a house, the electricity is running, two big trees in the yard leaning against the facilities.”

The president of the Northwest Florida area told me they have over 3,000 volunteers willing to help people in need. Many have traveled from everywhere and set up tents to help with the service.

Kevin Curtis said: “When we do serve, we are not trying to evangelize or change anyone’s point of view, we are just here trying to show our love and help with the best we can.”

When making a call to the hotline, a red dot appears on the crisis clean-up map.

“You look along the coast and some of these people are still trying to go home, so the icons don’t show up until they actually see their property,” said Michael LaVoy.

A local agency or group of volunteers will claim the job and it will turn yellow. Volunteers with the church say more than 2,000 families have received aid so far.

The president of the Northwest Florida area told me they have over 3,000 volunteers willing to help people in need. Many have traveled from everywhere and set up tents to help with the service.

Kevin Curtis said: “When we do serve, we are not trying to evangelize or change anyone’s point of view, we are just here trying to show our love and help with the best we can.”

When making a call to the hotline, a red dot appears on the crisis clean-up map.

“You look along the coast and some of these people are still trying to go home, so the icons don’t show up until they actually see their property,” said Michael LaVoy.

A local agency or group of volunteers will claim the job and it will turn yellow. Volunteers with the church say more than 2,000 families have received aid so far.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here